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Learning Beyond Registration (LBR)

Bio-psychosocial models of Dementia (Working with Behaviour that Challenges)

Introduction

The module aims to enable healthcare professionals, working within their practice setting, to develop the skills necessary to assess, formulate and intervene with behaviour that challenges in the dementias. This will involve developing a critical understanding of the biological, psychological and sociological models commonly applied to understanding these presentations and the use of formulation as a tool to collate the results of the assessment process.

Content

The contents/topics of this module will include:

  • Bio psychosocial models and concepts that provide understanding of behaviours that challenge
  • Individual direct/indirect person-centred assessment for challenging behaviour
  • Outline Formulation of assessment data
  • Multi-disciplinary working initiatives for challenging behaviour
  • Direct/Indirect/team person-centred interventions for challenging behaviours
  • Legal and ethical issues

Target audience

This module will be relevant to all health and social care professionals, including criminal justice workers, voluntary and private partner agencies.

Location

Institute of Mental Health, Innovation Park, Jubilee Campus, Nottingham

Module structure

This is a 30 credit module available as a shared learning module for Levels 3 and 4. It comprises of eight teaching days. Assessment for this module will be through the submission of a 5000 word written case study.

To apply

Visit the University of Nottingham website.

For further information please contact

Marissa Lambert, Module Leader on 0115 748 4205 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Working Age Dementia

Introduction

Dementia is often perceived as a condition that affects people in later life; however there are over 15,000 individuals across the UK who are living with dementia under the age of 65. Whilst symptoms of dementia may be similar regardless of age, the impact of such a condition on individuals and families at a younger age can be significantly different.

This module will guide students through an individual's journey of dementia, creating a forum for reflective practice to critically debate the differences when working with people under 65 years of age with dementia in comparison to older adults and reflect best practice guidelines recommended by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE).

Content

The content of this module will include:

  • An introduction to attitudes, perception and epidemiology of working age dementia
  • Understanding working age dementia within a bio-psychosocial model
  • Individual and family perspectives of living with working age dementia
  • Assessment and care planning
  • Pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions
  • Practical issues in the management of working age dementia
  • Recovery focused practice

Target audience

This module will be relevant to all health and social care professionals, including criminal justice workers, voluntary and private partner agencies.

Location

Institute of Mental Health, Innovation Park, Jubilee Campus, Nottingham

Module structure

This is a 30 credit module available as a shared learning module for Levels 3 and 4. It comprises of eight teaching days. Assessment for this module will be through the submission of a 5000 word written case study.

To apply

Visit the University of Nottingham website.

For further information please contact

Marissa Lambert, Module Leader on 0115 748 4205 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Risk Assessment in Mental Health Practice

Introduction

Contemporary professional practice in mental health requires understanding of systematic assessment and management of risk for a wide range of behaviours. This module enables students to have an advanced understanding of the concepts of risk, risk formulation, and risk management. It aims to provide a framework for best practice principles that supports practitioners across all mental health services. This involves making decisions that are evidence based, consistent, and seek to promote positive risk management.

Content

Effective risk assessment is integral to positive practice in responding to and managing risk. Safety is at the core of mental health service provision. This module will therefore reflect key issues outlined in 'Best Practice in Mental Health' (DoH, 2007) and will include the following content:

  • Concept of risk, risk factors, and risk formulation
  • Living with risk
  • Substance misuse and risk
  • Risk and self hard/suicide
  • Violence risk factors
  • Risk assessment to risk management

Target audience

This module will be relevant to all health and social care professionals, including criminal justice workers, voluntary and private partner agencies.

Location

Duncan Macmillan House, Porchester Road, Nottingham

Module structure

This is a 15 credit module, and comprises of five teaching days. Assessment for this module will be via a 20 minute formal presentation.

To apply

Visit the University of Nottingham website.

For further information please contact

Ray Woodcock, Module Leader on 01777 247 368 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Recovery Values and Principles

Introduction

This module focuses upon the significance of recovery-orientated practice in relation to contemporary mental healthcare and the development of service user movements. The concepts of schizophrenia and psychosis will be critically examined. Factors that inhibit recovery and social inclusion for people who experience psychosis will be explored. Best practice and service user driven approaches that support personal recovery from psychosis will underpin this module.

Content

This module will cover:

  • The concept of recovery, first person accounts and recovery models
  • Policy drivers that support recovery approaches
  • Cultural, socio-political factors that promote or inhibit recovery
  • Language, terminology and attitudes
  • Promoting hope and optimism
  • Case management models
  • Social inclusion
  • Translating recovery values and principles into practice

Target audience

This module will be relevant to all health and social care professionals, including criminal justice workers, voluntary and private partner agencies.

Location

Institute of Mental Health, Innovation Park, Jubilee Campus, Nottingham

Module structure

This is a 30 credit module, and comprises of eight teaching days. Assessment for this module will comprise of a 4000 word written case study and a 15 minute presentation.

To apply

Visit the University of Nottingham website.

For further information please contact

Chris Tandy, Module Leader on 0115 748 4203 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Recovery and Psychosis

Introduction

This module focuses upon the significance of recovery-orientated practice in relation to contemporary mental healthcare and the development of service user movements. The concepts of schizophrenia and psychosis will be critically examined. Factors that inhibit recovery and social inclusion for people who experience psychosis will be explored. Best practice and service user driven approaches that support personal recovery from psychosis will underpin this module.

Content

The module will provide introductions to:

  • Historical overview of recovery within the context the concept of psychosis
  • A critical review of the concept of schizophrenia
  • An exploration of past and present mental health treatments for psychosis
  • Policy drivers that support recovery and social inclusive practice
  • Development of the user movements within mental health
  • Factors that promote or inhibit recovery and social inclusion
  • Recovery orientated principles and recovery orientated practice initiatives
  • Boosters and barriers that support/hinder recovery and social inclusion
  • The significance of recovery orientated language, terminology and attitudes
  • Promoting hope, optimism and empowerment
  • Therapeutic engagement strategies and working with complex issues

Target audience

This module will be relevant to all health and social care professionals, including criminal justice workers, voluntary and private partner agencies.

Location

Institute of Mental Health, Innovation Park, Jubilee Campus, Nottingham

Module structure

This is a 30 credit post graduate module, and comprises of eight teaching days. This is a 30 credit module, and comprises of eight teaching days. Assessment for this module is through submission of a 5000 word case study.

To apply

Visit the University of Nottingham website

For further information please contact

Chris Tandy, Module Leader on 0115 748 4203 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Psychosocial Assessment and Formulation

Introduction

The National Institute for Clinical Excellence (2002 & 2009) have identified core intervention strategies for working with people who experience psychosis. It recommends that assessment, treatment, and support of individuals with mental health needs is based upon sound evidence and best practice. This module enables students to gain a practical understanding of a psychosocial approach to assessment and formulation of individual needs.

Content

The content of this module will cover contemporary views and theory related to a bio-psychosocial understanding of psychosis and its assessment. This will include:

  • Personal recovery values and principles
  • Stress vulnerability models, history and MDT practice
  • Bio-psychosocial understanding of psychosis and individual experiences
  • Engagement and interpersonal skills
  • Systematic assessment and the application of structured instruments
  • Formulation as a formal stage in the treatment planning cycle
  • Partnership working as part of an assessment and formulation process

Target audience

This module will be relevant to all health and social care professionals, including criminal justice workers, voluntary and private partner agencies. It is enhanced if taken with its sister module of 'Psychological and Social Interventions'.

Location

Duncan Macmillan House, Porchester Road, Nottingham

Module structure

This is a 30 credit module available as a shared learning module for Levels 3 and 4. It comprises of eight teaching days. Assessment for this module will be through the submission of a 5000 word written case study.

To apply

Visit the University of Nottingham website

For further information please contact

Ray Woodcock, Module Leader on 01777 247 368 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Psychological Therapies for Voices and Paranoia

Introduction

The module aims to assist students to develop the ability to critically consider a range of psychologically informed ways of working with people who experience psychosis.  It aims to equip students with a repertoire of psychologically based intervention skills to empower people who experience voices and paranoia. The value of supervision will be promoted and students encouraged to seek out and access appropriate supervision within the course and if required at their place of work.

Content

The module will provide introductions to:

  • Analysing voices, paranoia and alternative beliefs
  • Developing a construct for interventions
  • Learning how to deal with voices paranoia and other beliefs
  • Short term strategies
  • Long term strategies
  • Voice profiling and dialogue
  • Using the service user's theory

Target audience

This module will be relevant to all health and social care professionals, including criminal justice workers, voluntary and private partner agencies.

Location

Institute of Mental Health, Innovation Park, Jubilee Campus, Nottingham

Module structure

This is a 30 credit module available as a shared learning module for Levels 3 and 4. It comprises of eight teaching days. Assessment for this module
will be through the submission of a 5000 word written case study.

To apply

Visit the University of Nottingham website

For further information please contact

Chris Tandy, Module Leader on 0115 748 4203 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Psychological and Social Interventions

Introduction

The aim of the module is for students to develop a range of psychological and social intervention skills for working with people who experience common mental health difficulties and more specifically those who experience the distress often associated with unusual or persecutory beliefs, or distressing voices. This module is designed to support a psychosocial formulation driven approach to working therapeutically with people that promotes recovery, independence and enhances self-management.

Content

This module will include:

  • Medication (use, abuse, and non use)
  • Personal recovery planning
  • Relapse signatures and relapse prevention
  • Working with trauma
  • Psycho-education
  • Coping skills enhancement
  • Working with families
  • Strengths, interests, and social therapies
  • Psychological management of distressing experiences

Target audience

This module will be relevant to all health and social care professionals, including criminal justice workers, voluntary and private partner agencies. Prior to undertaking this module it is recommended that students complete the module 'Psychosocial Assessment and Formulation.

Location

Duncan Macmillan House, Porchester Road, Nottingham

Module structure

This is a 15 credit module, and comprises of five teaching days. Assessment for this module is through submission of a 3000 word written case study.

To apply

Visit the University of Nottingham website

For further information please contact

Ray Woodcock, Module Leader on 01777 247 368 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Political, Social and Health Context of Addictive Behaviours

Introduction

The aim of this module is to enable students to become aware of issues in relation to the assessment and treatment of people with co-morbid substance
misuse problems. Students will be able to recognise how substance misuse relates to the presentation of people and be aware of existing resources and
strategies that might be offered to help individuals address their complex needs.

Content

The content of this module will cover contemporary views and theories related to addictive behaviours.

This module will cover:

  • Epidemiological issues
  • Socio-political and economic factors
  • Health and social factors
  • Mental health associated issues
  • Gender and diversity
  • Co-morbidity issues in high risk groups
  • Trauma and PTSD
  • Crime and offending
  • Models of health promotion
  • Models of service delivery
  • Treatment approaches
  • Physical health complications

Target audience

This module will be relevant to all health and social care professionals, including criminal justice workers, voluntary and private partner agencies. It is particularly relevant in clinical and community settings where students regularly encounter people who present with substance misuse problems.

Location

Mike Harris Learning and Development Centre, Rampton Hospital

Module structure

This is a 30 credit module available as a shared learning module at Levels 3 and 4. It comprises of eight teaching days. Assessment for this module will be through the submission of a 5000 word written case study.

To apply

Visit the University of Nottingham website.

For further information please contact

Dr Glen Thomas, Module Leader on 01777 247 365 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Older Adults with Mental Health Needs/Dementia

Introduction

The aim of the module is to enable each student to develop knowledge, skills and clinical effectiveness through a greater understanding of the key considerations of working with older adults with mental health needs and/or dementia and their families. This module aims to provide students with a wide range of skills that can be applied in their clinical practice; including being able to critically reflect and present a person centred and values based care intervention.

Content

The contents/topics of this module will include:

  • Bio psychosocial models and concepts of working with older adults with mental health needs and dementia
  • Policy drivers that support person centred approaches
  • Assessment and case management
  • Translating person centred values and principles into practice
  • Working with carers and families
  • Risk enablement
  • Applying communication skills
  • Working age dementia
  • Learning disabilities and dementia
  • Life story work and cognitive stimulation therapy
  • Pharmacology and older people
  • Legal and ethical issues including capacity and consent

Target audience

This module will be relevant to all health and social care professionals, including criminal justice workers, voluntary and private partner agencies.

Location

Institute of Mental Health, Innovation Park, Jubilee Campus, Nottingham

Module structure

This is a 30 credit module available as a shared learning module for Levels 3 and 4. It comprises of eight teaching days. Assessment for this module will comprise of a 3000 word written case study and a 15 minute presentation.

To apply

Visit the University of Nottingham website

For further information please contact

Marissa Lambert, Module Leader on 0115 748 4205 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mindfulness Based Therapeutic Approaches

Introduction

The relevance of the transformative potential of mindfulness to contemporary life is increasingly being recognised.  Applications of this approach include the management of stress, anxiety, chronic pain, drug and alcohol use, and relapse prevention in depression. This module provides an introduction to mindfulness based approaches including the origins, theoretical model and application of mindfulness based cognitive therapy, and mindfulness based stress reduction techniques.

Content

Mindfulness-based approaches are now being used in a range of settings including hospitals, community care settings, schools, prisons and businesses.
This module is co-delivered by people with lived experience of various therapies as well as being mindfulness practitioners.

This module will cover:

  • The philosophical roots of mindfulness based approaches
  • Importance of personal engagement with mindfulness
  • Current evidence base supporting mindfulness based approaches
  • The usefulness and suitability of mindfulness based approaches
  • Introduction to mindfulness based stress reduction and mindfulness based cognitive therapy
  • The relationship to acceptance and commitment therapy
  • Ethical considerations of using mindfulness based approaches.
  • Personal practice of mindfulness

Target audience

This module will be relevant to all health and social care professionals, including criminal justice workers, voluntary and private partner agencies. It is enhanced if taken with its sister module of 'Acceptance and Commitment Therapy'.

Location

Mike Harris Learning and Development Centre, Rampton Hospital

Module structure

This is a 30 credit module, and comprises of eight teaching days. Assessment for this module will comprise of a 5000 word written case study.

To apply

Visit the University of Nottingham website.

For further information please contact

Kieran Fahy, Module Leader on 0115 748 4574 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Making Sense of Voices and Paranoia

Introduction

This module focuses upon making sense of voices and paranoia through the processes of assessment and formulation. The development of voices and
paranoia and collecting biographical data to identify trauma histories and psychosocial processes will be central to help people make sense of these
phenomena. This module will be delivered collaboratively with a partner training service user organisation with lived experience of voices and paranoia.

Content

The module will provide introductions to:

  • Engagement principles and therapeutic strategies to assist the assessment and formulation process
  • The three stages of paranoia and voices
  • Trauma triad model
  • Assessment methods for voices, paranoia and distressing beliefs
  • The Maastricht interview for voices and paranoia
  • Maastricht interview report writing and building constructs
  • Formulating assessment data

Target audience

This module will be relevant to all health and social care professionals, including criminal justice workers, voluntary and private partner agencies.

Location

Institute of Mental Health, Innovation Park, Jubilee Campus, Nottingham

Module structure

This is a 30 credit module available as a shared learning module for Levels 3 and 4. It comprises of eight teaching days. Assessment for this module
will be through the submission of a 5000 word written case study.

To apply

Visit the University of Nottingham website.

For further information please contact

Chris Tandy, Module Leader on 0115 748 4203 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Intellectual Disabilities (ID) and Mental Health

Introduction

It is estimated that around 40% of adults with ID have additional mental health needs. This places people with ID at a greater risk of mental health problems than the general population, where it's estimated that around 1 in 6 (just under 17%), are experiencing a mental health problem at any one time. The Valuing People papers (DOH 2001, 2007& 2009) recognise this as an important health and social justice concern, and recognise the need for specialist ID services for those individuals with more complex needs.

Content

This module will require students to think critically about issues of mental health and recovery, and specifically how they apply to people with intellectual disability. This understanding will inform practice and promote a reflective and evidence-based approach to all stages of students' relationships with service users, families and professionals.

The content of this module includes:

  • Models of mental health
  • Vulnerability and protective factors
  • Assessment and engagement of mental health
  • Formulation skills
  • Therapeutic interventions
  • Recovery values and principles
  • Legal and ethical issues

Target audience

This module will be relevant to all health and social care professionals, criminal justice workers, voluntary and private partner agencies.

Location

Duncan Macmillan House, Porchester Road, Nottingham

Module structure

This is a 30 credit module available as a shared learning module for Levels 3 and 4. It comprises of eight teaching days. Assessment for this module will be through the submission of a 5000 word written case study.

To apply

Visit the University of Nottingham website

For further information please contact

Chris Tandy, Module Leader on 0115 748 4203 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Family Work and Psychosis

Introduction

It has been shown that there are significant advantages to working collaboratively alongside families and friends who are in contact with a person who experiences psychosis.

This module will focus upon behavioural family intervention strategies aimed at reducing the risk of becoming unwell and improving the quality of life for those concerned.

Content

The content of this module includes:

  • Research evidence underpinning family interventions and psychosis
  • Family work and models
  • Engagement strategies, dealing with blame, loss and stress
  • Introduction to family assessments
  • The 'Expressed Emotion' concept and its relevance to practice
  • Communication skills training - behavioural family therapy
  • Principles of health promotion (group, individual, family, timing and pace, degree of information)

Target audience

This module will be relevant to all health and social care professionals, including criminal justice workers, voluntary and private partner agencies.

Location

Duncan Macmillan House, Porchester Road, Nottingham

Module structure

This is a 15 credit module, and comprises of five teaching days.  Assessment for this module will be through submission of a 3000 word written case study.

To apply

Visit the University of Nottingham website.

For further information please contact

Chris Tandy, Module Leader on 01777 247 530 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Coping Skills and Wellness Planning

Introduction

Contrary to assumptions, people are not simply passive recipients of mental distress. People do and will make meaningful attempts to either change the nature of a stressor or manage the emotional reaction to any related distress.

The module aims to highlight the importance of self initiated coping in managing distressing experiences and to focus upon strengthening and enhancing
positive strategies to maintain wellness and promote independence.

Content

One of the goals of healthcare practice is to work with people to improve their health and independence. Sometimes this may mean living well even with the presence of potentially distressing mental health experiences.

The content of this module includes:

  • The role of coping within a stress-vulnerability framework
  • Categorisation and function of coping responses
  • Coping skills enhancement and development; illness management techniques
  • Health promotion and wellness strategies
  • Involving clients and enhancing partnership working

Target audience

This module will be relevant to all health and social care professionals, criminal justice workers, voluntary and private partner agencies. It is particularly relevant in clinical and community settings where students regularly encounter people who present with substance abuse problems.

Location

Duncan Macmillan House, Porchester Road, Nottingham

Module structure

This is a 30 credit module, and comprises of eight teaching days. Assessment for this module will be through submission of a 5000 word written case study.

To apply

Visit the University of Nottingham website.

For further information please contact

Ray Woodcock, Module Leader on 01777 247 368 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Compassion Focused Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Principles

Introduction

This module aims to introduce students to the theory and principles underpinning Compassion Focused Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CFT) and develop
competency in the area of assessing the client's difficulties within a CFT framework. It will focus upon competency in the area of 'assisted self-help'. The way this is achieved is by introducing course members to manualised approaches as a vehicle to understand the principles of CFT and the flow of assessment to formulation and treatment planning.

Content

This module will cover:

  • History and policy context of CFT
  • Theoretical background
  • The research evidence in CFT
  • An introduction to models of understanding common mental health difficulties, e.g. depression and anxiety
  • CFT assessment
  • Engagement – the therapeutic relationship
  • Interview skills
  • Conceptual frameworks
  • Barriers and boosters to engagement
  • Complex needs
  • Supervision and ethics
  • Formulation
  • Treatment Planning

Target audience

This module will be relevant to all health and social care professionals, including criminal justice workers, voluntary and private partner agencies.

Location

Mike Harris Learning and Development Centre, Rampton Hospital

Module structure

This is a 30 credit module, and comprises of six teaching days. Assessment for this module will comprise of a 5000 word written case study.

To apply

Visit the University of Nottingham website.

For further information please contact

Kieran Fahy, Module Leader on 0115 748 4574 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Assessment and Case Formulation of Addictive Behaviours

Introduction

The aim of the module is to enable students to engage more effectively with clients with complex mental health needs, personality disorder, intellectual disabilities and substance abuse challenges. It aims to develop a broad understanding of the relevance and effectiveness of a number of approaches for working with clients with co-morbid substance misuse problems.

Content

This module will cover:

  • Motivational interviewing principles and practice
  • Assessment of addictive behaviours
  • Engaging clients through motivational interviewing
  • Case formulation
  • Considering complex needs
  • Evidence base for interventions
  • Recognising diversity issues
  • Group approaches to working with addictive behaviours
  • Group work skills
  • Maintaining treatment processes
  • Supervision and reflection

Target audience

This module will be relevant to all health and social care professionals, criminal justice workers, voluntary and private partner agencies. It is particularly relevant in clinical and community settings where students regularly encounter people who present with substance abuse problems.

Location

Mike Harris Learning and Development Centre, Rampton Hospital

Module structure

This is a 30 credit module available as a shared learning module for Levels 3 and 4. It comprises of eight teaching days. Assessment for this module will be through the submission of a 5000 word written case study.

To apply

Visit the University of Nottingham website.

For further information please contact

Dr Glen Thomas, Module Leader on 01777 247365 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Introduction

This module aims to introduce students to the theory and principles of Acceptance and Commitment approaches and to begin to develop a skill base. It aims to enable students to engage with the philosophical and conceptual bases of these approaches and to take a critical stance on their use in contemporary health and social care practice. It has been developed in partnership with and co-delivered by people with lived experience of various therapies as well as
being ACT practitioners.

Content

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a modern behaviour therapy that combines mindfulness and acceptance strategies with behavioural activation strategies to help increase people's mental health, resilience, life purpose, and psychological flexibility.

This module will cover:

  • Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
  • Personal practice of mindfulness
  • The six core processes of ACT
  • Developing willingness/acceptance
  • Undermining cognitive fusion
  • Getting in contact with the present moment
  • Defining valued directions
  • Building patterns of committed action
  • Conceptualising cases using ACT
  • The ACT therapeutic stance
  • Bringing it all together

Target audience

This module will be relevant to all health and social care professionals, criminal justice workers, voluntary and private partner agencies. It is enhanced if taken with its sister module of 'Mindfulness'.

Location

Mike Harris Learning and Development Centre, Rampton Hospital

Module structure

This is a 30 credit module, and comprises of eight teaching days. Assessment for this module will be through the submission of a 5000 word written case study.

To apply

Visit the University of Nottingham website

For further information please contact

Kieran Fahy, Module Leader, 0115 748 4574 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.